The Director

Nicolas Sanchez (Santiago de Chile, 1981) lives and works in London, UK.

In 2009, after wining the first prize of the Juan Downey award for Film, he decided to shoot his first long feature documentary film. With a 7 year background on fine arts and digital media Sanchez has developed and audiovisual research (film/photography) mixing landscape intervention with performance, seeking to question our approach to nature and culture.

With the backdrop of an increasingly uncertain and bleak global future Sanchez conducts his work as an ongoing audiovisual study that incorporates both performance and intervention in the physical landscape. Just as Romanticism arose in response to the excesses of 18th Century rationalism and its broken utopian promises, Sanchez uses his landscapes as a form of romantic escapism whilst breathing into them a feeling of desperation, melancholy, anger and hope.

More of his work can be seen on his visual artist portfolio at www.nicolassanchezl.com


Backstage


“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life...” H.D. Thoreau

In January 2010, in Thoreau’s way, I went by myself, carrying a camera and a tripod over my shoulders, through deserts and steppes in a pursuit journey to find life. I had always wanted to make a movie. When I decided to start I realised that I had already made it. Two people who I had met under certain (determinant) circumstances in my life, had built through me a discourse about life in the form of a full-length documentary. Although I was once again late to my own idea about making a film, it still needed to be filmed. This is how in January 2010 I parted by myself, camera and tripod over my shoulder, to film lives at ground level within determining geographies. I carried with me the minimum equipment possible, seeking to create an atmosphere of intimacy and sensibility that allowed the landscape, and those who inhabit it in silence, speak. There began a project as long and difficult as it is stimulant, a project that today, three years later, has finally reached its conclusion.